Recording Available – American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections

We were fortunate to have Drew Griffin, the Library’s Senior Librarian for Adult Services and bibliophile, join us for a lively and informative workshop titled American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections. The workshop, part of the Lunchtime Lectures from the Cambridge Room, was recorded on May 13, 2021.

The following is a description of the workshop and a short bio of Drew Griffin:

American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections
Join Drew Griffin, Cambridge Public Library’s Senior Librarian for Adult Services, as he takes us on a tour of the American Treasures in the Library’s Archives and Special Collections.  This lecture will focus on letters from George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Paul Revere, Margaret Fuller, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and more.  Discover all our Library has to offer with special, virtual trip into the vault.

Drew Griffin has worked at the Cambridge Public Library for the past 15 years in various capacities.  Since 2016, he has served as Senior Librarian in the Adult Services Department.  Drew’s area of expertise is genealogy and rare book librarianship.   Over the past 3 years, Drew has taught many of the Library’s popular genealogy workshops, including beginner’s genealogy and DNA testing and genealogical research.  Also, in his spare time, Drew is an avid rare book collector.  He is a member several bibliophile clubs, including the Grolier Club in New York City and the Ticknor Society in Boston.  

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4 thoughts on “Recording Available – American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections

  1. Megan Marshall

    Hi! Listening to this fascinating presentation. Just wanted to offer a correction on the manner of Margaret Fuller’s death. There was no fire at sea, just a big storm. The ship ran aground off Fire Island. Thanks again for calling attention to Fuller’s life and work along with all the other fascinating folk in this presentation. Wonderful collection!

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  2. Megan Marshall

    Hi! Listening to this fascinating presentation. Just wanted to offer a correction on the manner of Margaret Fuller’s death. There was no fire at sea, just a big storm. The ship ran aground off Fire Island. Thanks again for calling attention to Fuller’s life and work along with all the other fascinating folk in this presentation. Wonderful collection!
    A second point– “Auntie Wee-wee” is almost certainly LMA’s nephew’s way of saying “Auntie Louisa.” Many young children have trouble pronouncing “Louisa,” and “Weezie” or other similar names become nicknames for Louisa.
    Thanks again for this excellent offering, CPL!

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    1. The Cambridge Room Post author

      Thank you, Megan, for your comments! They are greatly appreciated. I have forwarded them to Drew Griffin. I also thought Fuller’s ship caught on fire and sank. I always wondered how people were able to retrieve some of her belongings if everything had burned – it never quite made sense. I guess several of us have confused Fire Island with the ship catching fire. Now I will remember it was a bad storm.
      Thanks for clarifying!

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