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Posts Tagged ‘Cambridge Room’

The Cambridge Public Library is taking our Beginner’s Genealogy Workshop Series on the road.  This January we will be offering the 4-week series at CCTV, located at 438 Massachusetts Avenue.  It’s the same class – just a different location.

Wednesdays, 6-8 PM
January 10, 17, 24, & 31
Instructors:  Alyssa Pacy, Archivist, and Drew Griffin, Senior Librarian
Location:  CCTV computer classroom, 438 Massachusetts Avenue

Join us for a 4-week, beginner’s genealogy workshop. For two hours each week, we will demystify the overwhelming process of sorting through online records as well as give tips for how best to make use of research visits to local repositories. We will help you find ancestors, organize your research, and start a family tree. Come with a new question every week and leave with an answer and something tangible to bring home, such as a copy of a birth certificate. By taking this class, you will be automatically eligible to enroll in a FREE, two-part course on digital storytelling taught by CCTV. Learn how to make a digital film about your family’s history based on your genealogical research. Create a treasured digital keepsake to pass on to family members. Registration is mandatory.  To register, please contact Keaton Fox at keaton@cctvcambridge.org.

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Broadside, Dear Gaybashers by Jill McDonough, illustrated by Michael Shapiro, from the Michael Shapiro Papers.

Pride, Cambridge-Style

Exhibition Location: 2nd Floor of the Main Library

A selection of broadsides, poems, and posters celebrating LGBTQ+ life are currently on display. Curated by Daniel Wuenschel, this exhibitions draws from the Cambridge Room’s collections and feature poets and artists connected to Cambridge.

Two poems
Landscape without Touch and Still Life by Olga Broumas
from Soie Sauvage: Poems, published by Copper Canyon Press, 1979
Available in the Louisa Solano Papers.

Broadside
Dear Gaybashers by Jill McDonough, illustrated by Michael Shapiro
“Printed in honor of Jill McDonough’s reading at Cambridge Public Library on October 28, 2015”
Available in the Michael Shapiro Papers.

Broadside
Lines for Chelsea Manning by John Mulrooney, designed by Mark Lamoureux, printed on the occasion of the author’s reading at the 2016 Boston Poetry Marathon in Inman Square, Cambridge
Available in the Daniel Wuenschel Papers.

Poster
Reading and Book Signing celebrating the publication of the book The Letters of James Schuyler to Frank O’Hara, edited by William Corbett
Pierre Menard Gallery, Cambridge
Saturday, October 21 2006
Available in the William Corbet Papers.

Poem
In Memory of Joe Brainerd by Frank Bidart
From Desire, published by Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1997
Available in the Louisa Solano Papers.

Book
Nuestra Senora de los Dolores: The San Francisco Experience by Charley Shively, published by Good Gay Poets, 1975
Available in the Louisa Solano Papers.

Poster
Celebrating 10 Years of Marriage Equality, designed by Luke Kirkland, 2014, Cambridge Public Library.
Available in the Cambridge Public Library Records.

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Cambridge City Council Hearing at Rindge Tech auditorium on the death of Larry Largey, young people from the Roosevelt Towers area, October 1972, copyright Olive Pierce.

Thank you to Scout Cambridge for their recent article, From Rent Control to Riot Squads: The Photographs of Olive Pierce, profiling the amazing work of documentary photographer Olive Pierce as well as the work we do in the Cambridge Room.

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The Cambridge Room recently acquired this great little trading card from the James O. Welch, Co.  The Welch Company was one of Cambridge’s many confectioners who was famous for introducing the world to Junior Mints, Sugar Daddys, Sugar Babies, and Sugar Mamas.  Welch’s produced 50 trading cards each with their own character.  The cards are fairly small, measuring 1.5 inches in width by 2.75 inches in length.

Does anyone remember these trading cards?

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Wikipedia-logo[1]

Wikipedia-Loves-Libraries Cambridge Edit-a-thon
Do you want to learn more about Cambridge history, or do you already know how great Cambridge is and want to share your knowledge with the world?  Help us create and improve Wikipedia articles about Cambridge — members of the public and all levels of experience welcome!  Join the library’s archivist and an experienced Wikipedian for an evening of research, writing, and fun. For more information and to see a list of topics to be researched, click here:  http://bit.ly/OAMass13_CPL or follow #OAMass13 on Twitter.

Wednesday, October 23
5:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Cambridge Room
Cambridge Public Library

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Wikipedia-logo[1]

Wikipedia-Loves-Libraries Cambridge Edit-a-thon
Do you want to learn more about Cambridge history, or do you already know how great Cambridge is and want to share your knowledge with the world?  Help us create and improve Wikipedia articles about Cambridge — members of the public and all levels of experience welcome!  Join the library’s archivist and an experienced Wikipedian for an evening of research, writing, and fun. For more information and to see a list of topics to be researched, click here:  http://bit.ly/OAMass13_CPL or follow #OAMass13 on Twitter.

Wednesday, October 23
5:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Cambridge Room
Cambridge Public Library

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Photo credit, cnn.com.

The Cambridge Room gets a lot of obituary requests.  We do, after all, have the only surviving full run of the Cambridge Chronicle, the oldest, continually published weekly newspaper in America.   Obituaries are key to genealogists researching family members and historians researching little known locals.  The more detailed, the better.

We just came across this great article from cnn.com, called Funny Obits Bring New Life to a Dying Art, about the fine art of writing an obit and the craftsmanship of the journalists who publish them.  The article is an anthology of great obits.

A few highlighted obits are:

Pluto the Planet, 76, died Thursday in Prague, Czech Republic, when it was killed by the International Astronomical Union — downgraded to a lowly ‘dwarf planet.’ No memorial service is planned, because it’s been several years since astronomers considered Pluto a real planet.
–Kay Powell, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Denisa Lady Newborough, who has died aged 79, was many things: wire-walker, nightclub girl, nude dancer, air pilot. She only refused to be two things — a whore and a spy — ‘and there were attempts to make me both,’ she once wrote.
–The Daily Telegraph

Harry Weathersby Stamps, ladies’ man, foodie, natty dresser, and accomplished traveler, died on Saturday, March 9, 2013.  He had a life-long love affair with deviled eggs, Lane cakes, boiled peanuts, Vienna [Vi-e-na] sausages on saltines, his homemade canned fig preserves, pork chops, turnip greens, and buttermilk served in martini glasses garnished with cornbread.  The women in his life were numerous. He particularly fancied smart women.
–Mississippi Sun Herald, by Stamps’ daughter

Selma Koch, a Manhattan store owner who earned a national reputation by helping women find the right bra size, mostly through a discerning glance and never with a tape measure, died Thursday at Mount Sinai Medical Center. She was 95 and a 34B.
–Douglas Martin, The New York Times

Jim Nicholson’s, the Godfather of contemporary obit writers, sums it up best with his take on the obit:

Most people get three opportunities to make the local news: Birth, marriage and death. Hatch, match and dispatch. Obits bring the deceased out onto the public stage, many for the first and only time, to give them a grand goodbye and in effect, decree to all the readers that this was a life well lived. It is a public validation.

That’s why the Cambridge Room gets so many obit requests.

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