Tag Archives: Central Square

Central to It All: A Look at Central Square, the Nightclub ManRay, and Twenty Years of Change

Date & Time:
April 27, 2022
7:00pm – 8:30pm
In Person
REGISTER HERE

Central Square in the 1980s was at the jumping-off point for a new beginning. Shops, restaurants, and long-standing businesses lined the square. However, the one area that was expanding greatly was in the realm of nightlife. Venues such as the Middle East, The Cantab Lounge, and T.T the Bears were bringing in both local and national performing artists. Joining these venues was a nightclub, Campus, on 21 Brookline St. In 1985, that space became ManRay. A nightclub that promoted what they called the “Art of Nightlife.” ManRay promoted dance nights for many cultures, sub-cultures, and scenes such as Goth, Industrial, Fetish, New Wave, and those in the LBGTQIA communities. Like the other music venues in the square, ManRay had a dynamic roster of artists and bands that performed there that included Divine, Peter Murphy, KMFDM, Sleep Chamber, and, most notably, Nirvana. 

Join Shawn Driscoll, author of We are But Your Children:  An Oral History of the Nightclub Manray (2021), us for a look into Central Square during the years of ManRay’s existence. Through presentation and a rich panel of speakers, we will explore the years of 1983 to 2006 and witness the growth and dynamic change within the square, through the lens of ManRay and its twenty years at 21 Brookline Street. Joining Driscoll will be:

Terri Niedzwiecki–Longtime Bartender, ManRay
MJ Pullins–Proprietor, Hubba Hubba
Emily Sweeney–Boston Globe Journalist, ManRay Attendee
Tony Lee (DJ Arcanus)–DJ (ManRay, Ceremony) ManRay Attendee
David “Daisy” Crowder–Bartender, ManRay

Register for: Central to It All: A look at Central Square, the Nightclub ManRay, and Twenty Years of Change

Date & Time:
September 22, 2021
6:30pm – 8:00pm
Main Library
Lecture Hall
REGISTER HERE

Central to It All: A look at Central Square, the Nightclub ManRay, and Twenty Years of Change
Central Square in the 1980s was at the jumping-off point for a new beginning. Shops, restaurants, and long-standing businesses lined the square. However, the one area that was expanding greatly was in the realm of nightlife. Venues such as the Middle East, The Cantab Lounge, and T.T the Bears were bringing in both local and national performing artists. Joining these venues was a nightclub, Campus, on 21 Brookline St. In 1985, that space became ManRay. A nightclub that promoted what they called the “Art of Nightlife.” ManRay promoted dance nights for many cultures, sub-cultures, and scenes such as Goth, Industrial, Fetish, New Wave, and those in the LBGTQIA communities. Like the other music venues in the square, ManRay had a dynamic roster of artists and bands that performed there that included Divine, Peter Murphy, KMFDM, Sleep Chamber, and, most notably, Nirvana.

Join us for a look into Central Square during the years of ManRay’s existence. Through presentation and a rich panel of speakers, we will explore the years of 1983 to 2006 and witness the growth and dynamic change within the square, through the lens of ManRay and its twenty years at 21 Brookline St. 

If This Library Could Talk…


Construction of the Central Square Library , circa 1973.

“If This Library Could Talk…”
Central Square Branch Library
45 Pearl Street

1894
Owner Joseph A. Stubbs receives a permit from the City to build a carriage house.  W. H. Leach is the builder.

31 March 1900
The Stubbs family advertises their 7 room, harbor view cottage in South Wellfleet for rent for the season.  Inquiries to be made at 45 Pearl Street with Mrs. M. J. Aitner.

27 October 1900
The Stubs have lost their black and white cat.  For a reward, bring cat to 45 Pearl Street.

31 December 1913
The funeral is held for Mary Stubs, 72, and widow of Joseph A. Stubs at 3 p.m. at 45 Pearl Street.

28 October 1922
Miss Carolyn Stubbs (Radcliffe class of 1924) of 45 Pearl Street makes the Dean’s list.

1973
Ground is broken on this site for the Central Square Branch Library.

April 1976
The Library opens as part of the complex that included the municipal parking garage and the Manning Apartments.  The Library cost $851,000 and boasted 15,000 square feet of fire proof and air conditioned library and community meeting space.

1984
The Central Square Branch offered the most programs to the greatest number of people, including its annual Martin Luther King Day celebration.

1986
The Literacy Center opens to provide tutoring and combat illiteracy among children and adults.

1988
Governor Michael Dukakis launches the Commonwealth Literacy Campaign, an effort to help functionally illiterate adults to read, from the Library.

1999
The Rotary Technology Center opens to keep up with the demand of personal computer use.

Please stop by the Central Square Branch to pick up supplies to make your own sign for “If This House Could Talk…”