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Posts Tagged ‘Correspondence’

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Alice Ronchetti outside the Cambridge Public Library Branch No.1 in 1935.

 

 

We are pleased to announce that the Alice M. Ronchetti Papers, 1935-1973, have been digitized and can now be viewed online, in addition to the original hard copies being available for research at the Cambridge Public Library.

Alice Ronchetti worked as a librarian for the Cambridge Public Library for 38 years, from 1935 until her retirement in 1973. During her professional life, Ronchetti dedicated herself to the needs of both young people and adults. Her “unselfish and outstanding service to the citizens of Cambridge” was noted by the Board of Library Trustees in their resolution to accept her retirement from her position of head librarian.

This collection contains Alice Ronchetti’s professional documents and photographs. The documents include her Certificate of Librarianship and two letters that document her retirement: one acceptance letter from library Director Joseph G. Sakey and one resolution passed by the Board of Library Trustees. The photographs in this collection were taken at East Cambridge (now the O’Connell Branch) and Mount Auburn (now the Collins Branch). They depict Alice Ronchetti’s work life in the Cambridge Public Library system, including her co-workers, children she worked with, and events held at the library. Some of the photographs were undated and the dates have been estimated.

Alice Mary Ronchetti was born on May 24, 1912 to Cesar Ronchetti (b. 1884) and Clotilde Nicoli (1883-1974) in Boston, Massachusetts. She was one of six siblings (Alfred, Joseph, Rose Mary, Mary, and James). Her family moved to Cambridge around 1921. Ronchetti died on October 1, 1986 at age 74 and is buried in the North Cambridge Catholic Cemetery.

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These 1942 Postcards can be found in the Henry M. Nevin Correspondence.

We are pleased to announce to the Henry M. Nevin Correspondence, 1942-1949 is open for research.

History
Henry Miller Nevin was born November 5, 1914 in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, to Franklin T., a lawyer, and Elizabeth B. Nevin. He had a sister, Margaret, who was eight years older than him, and an older brother, Franklin, Jr., died in 1920. His family moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts in the mid-1930s and lived at various addresses, including 43 Thorndike Street and 34 Ash Street.

Nevin received an A.B. from Williams College in 1936 and an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1938. After his father’s death, Nevin lived at 1 Waterhouse Street in Cambridge with his widowed mother. He enlisted in the U.S. Army on December 16, 1942. For most of his term of service, he was stationed in Darjeeling, India.

Nevin worked in finance when he returned to the United States after his military service. He was an analyst and wrote a weekly investment advice column for United Business Service until his retirement in 1984. He was also on the board of the Pax World Fund, a mutual fund with a mission to make socially responsible investments, in its early years.

Nevin was a deacon of the Cambridge Congregational Church and was involved with a number of charitable and human services organizations, including the Massachusetts Fair Housing Commission, the City Mission Society, the Margaret Fuller House, and Interfaith Housing, Inc. He also served on the City of Cambridge Civic Unity Committee. Nevin died on July 12, 1992.

Collection Overview
The Henry M. Nevin correspondence consists of letters, postcards, and V-mail written by or to Nevin while he was serving in the military during World War II. The largest portion of the collection consists of letters and V-mail written by Nevin to his mother, Elizabeth (Mrs. Frederick Nevin). Many of the letters are very detailed and provide interesting information about Nevin’s daily routines, activities, and surroundings. There are about 40 letters and V-mails written by Nevin’s mother to him which provide glimpses of life back in Cambridge. The other major correspondent is James Barraclough, a friend who also served in the military; there are about 10 pieces of correspondence from Barraclough, some from the years after the war’s conclusion. The collection also includes a small number of pieces of correspondence to or from other people, as well as Nevin’s Office of Dependency Benefits application approval card and some address lists and notes.

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A 1943 Naval Christmas letter from the Alfred Cavileer Jr. Correspondence in the Cambridge Room.

We are pleased to announce that the Alfred Cavileer Jr. Correspondence, 1942-1948 is now available for research.

History
Alfred Cavileer Jr. was a naval combatant in World War II. He was stationed at the San Francisco Naval Base.

Collection Overview
The Alfred Cavileer Jr. correspondence consists mainly of letters written by or to Cavileer while he was serving in the military during World War II. The largest portion of the collection consists of letters written by Cavileer to his mother, Mrs. Alfred Cavileer. Many of the letters are very detailed and provide interesting information about Cavileer’s daily routines, activities, and surroundings. Another frequent correspondent is Cavileer’s brother, Robert. Some letters are addressed to both his mother and brother. One folder includes letters written to Alfred Jr. by people other than his mother and brother. The collection also includes a small number of pieces of correspondence to or from other people, as well as a few religious service programs and receipts.

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