Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection’

We just made two more decades, from 1924-1941, of the Cambridge Tribune freely searchable on our Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection.  Now you can search the Cambridge Tribune from 18887-1941.  Search away!

Read Full Post »

Main
The location of the Charles H. Cutting Fish and Oyster Market, 359 Main Street.

Last week, we asked our readers to help us identify the photograph of the Fish and Oyster Market pictured below.  Thanks to PJN, we learned that it is the Charles H. Cutting Fish and Oyster Market, located at 359  Main Street, on the corner of Moore Street.

359

We found this ad in the Cambridge Historic Newspaper Collection, in the May 21st 1887 edition of the Cambridge Chronicle.

359 Main Street is now the location of Newtowne Court – Moore Street no longer exists.

img012

Read Full Post »

As those of us in the Northeast batten down the hatches and prepare for what’s being described as potentially a storm of “historic” proportions, many of us are stockpiling supplies and entertainments to get us through the next 48-72 hours. If you’re looking for something to add to your list of the latter, the Cambridge Room’s Historic Cambridge Newspapers collection provides many hours of distraction, and, in keeping with the preoccupation of the moment, there are plenty of references to past storms and blizzards to be found. Fittingly enough, the Wikipedia article for The Great Blizzard of 1888, known as one of the harshest snow storms ever in the United States, cites one of them.

Article from the Cambridge Press, 17 March 1888

 

This article suggests that, locally at least, The Great Blizzard of 1888 was not so great and that it was felt to be much worse than it was because of the loss of communication systems, making a side jab at people feeling deprived to not know “every five minutes of the day, what is happening in New York or San Francisco or London.” (One can probably feel pretty confident of what the writer would think of our 24-hour news cycle of today.) We’ll see when we come out on the other side later this week whether Winter Storm Juno lives up to its fearsome advance billing. In the meantime, please stay safe, stay warm, and stay entertained — and why not correct a few newspaper articles or old weather logs while you’re at it?

Read Full Post »

While many people enjoy using our digital collections from anywhere they are, as you would imagine, not everything we have in the Cambridge Room is available online. As with most archives and special collections, many of our materials are only available during the Cambridge Room’s regular hours while an archivist is on duty. There is an intermediate category of access, however, and that’s for the materials that we have on microfilm.

 


Cambridge Room microfilm


 

Microfilming is a photographic process that makes highly reduced copies of original documents. It has been used in libraries and archives for over 100 years as a method for saving shelf space, reducing handling of fragile materials, and increasing access for on and offsite researchers. Microfilm was for the standard for preservation for decades and is still a very durable format as long as the film is maintained in appropriate storage conditions. Because of the small size of the images and the sometimes inconsistent process by which they were made, it’s not always a thing of beauty, but microfilm does greatly enhance access to large, bulky, and fragile paper materials like our newspapers, in addition to being an eminently useful format for scanning purposes as the difficult work of preparing and photographing the original has already been done. In fact, most of the materials we have online were digitized from microfilm reels, rather than the originals.

The Main Library of the Cambridge Public Library has one microfilm reader/scanner, which now resides in the second floor reference area. The Cambridge Room microfilm is available anytime the Main Library is open, not just during the Cambridge Room’s hours. (Though if you want specialized historical reference assistance, we still encourage you to come when the archivist is on duty.) To use microfilm during hours when the Cambridge Room is not open, please show an ID to the staff member at the reference desk. He or she will retrieve the relevant reel for you and set you up at the microfilm reader/scanner. Library staff are always available to help, but if you want to learn more about how to use our machine, a ScanPro 3000, there are a number of YouTube videos that explain the process. For example, here’s a video on loading film (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbiFyBc-WCY), and another on navigating it (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiksVh7rDsI) from the Brooks Memorial Library in Brattleboro, Vermont.

Microfilm reader/scanner at the Main Library

Microfilm reader/scanner station on the second floor of the Main Library

You have two options for getting output from the microfilm using this machine. We particularly encourage you to bring a USB flash drive and save your scans in PDF format as you go. You can also print a limited number of pages to the reference desk printer. Please see the staff person at the desk to retrieve your printouts.

We hope that you too will learn to appreciate microfilm and the ways it can aid and speed your research. And if you use the Cambridge Room’s microfilm when we’re not here, please drop us a line about your discoveries!

Read Full Post »

Untitled-1
18 April 1914 edition of the  Cambridge Chronicle.

Do you read the Cambridge Chronicle?  Have you ever used the Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection?  We’re conducting a brief survey to learn about the ways that users read and access Cambridge news, specifically the Cambridge Chronicle.   Take our short, 10 question survey here.

Thank you for your participation!

Read Full Post »

Untitled-1
18 April 1914 edition of the  Cambridge Chronicle.

Do you read the Cambridge Chronicle?  Have you ever used the Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection?  We’re conducting a brief survey to learn about the ways that users read and access Cambridge news, specifically the Cambridge Chronicle.   Take our short, 10 question survey here.

Thank you for your participation!

Read Full Post »

new_features_2

Tags are a new feature of the Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection upgrade.

The latest version of our Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection incorporates several new features that give you the ability to interact with digital collections and personalize your experience.

Tags – Placing tags on an article, an image, or an audio or video file helps group items into categories, making it easier for you to browse and search through collections by common themes.

Comments – Add comments about an article or item of any type.  Comments can be especially useful for adding context to historical photographs, maps,and manuscripts. Comments become instantly searchable by all everyone.

Private Lists – Bookmark items in the Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection and add them to “private lists.”  You can easily rename items, e-mail selections, and add or edit notes related to the items.  Delete lists, move items between lists, and remove items from lists.  Keep track of interesting content and set specific materials aside for easy access at a later date.  Lists are managed on the “My Account” page.

User History – The Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection now remembers your recently viewed items and your most recently added tags and comments.  When logged in, access your history of interactions under “My Account.”

To start using the Collection’s new features, log in or register.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »