Tag Archives: Maps of Cambridge

Register for Tomorrow’s Workshop: Cambridge by Map

Date & Time:
March 4, 2021
12:00pm – 1:00pm
REGISTER HERE

Cambridge by Map
How old is the Cambridge Public Library? What was Cambridge like in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? How has the city changed, and how has it stayed the same? Join the Leventhal Map Center on a virtual walk through historic Cambridge.  Using Atlascope, a tool for exploring urban maps in metropolitan Boston, the Map Center’s Public Engagement & Interpretation Coordinator Rachel Mead will take us on a trip into Cambridge historical geography.  Learn  how the city has changed over time, and discover how to research the history of your own house and neighborhood.  This event will be broadcast online at the Leventhal Map Center’s YouTube Live and Facebook Live channels.

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Register for Cambridge by Map

Date & Time:
March 4, 2021
12:00pm – 1:00pm
REGISTER HERE

Cambridge by Map
How old is the Cambridge Public Library? What was Cambridge like in the late 19th and early 20th centuries? How has the city changed, and how has it stayed the same? Join the Leventhal Map Center on a virtual walk through historic Cambridge.  Using Atlascope, a tool for exploring urban maps in metropolitan Boston, the Map Center’s Public Engagement & Interpretation Coordinator Rachel Mead will take us on a trip into Cambridge historical geography.  Learn  how the city has changed over time, and discover how to research the history of your own house and neighborhood.  This event will be broadcast online at the Leventhal Map Center’s YouTube Live and Facebook Live channels.

The Atlas Collection Is Now Available

A map of Boston from 1871 in the Atlas Collection in the Cambridge Room.

We are pleased to announce that the Atlases, 1873-1930 Collection is now available for research.

Collection Overview
This collection contains atlases on the subjects of Cambridge, Middlesex County, and Massachusetts by various surveyors, including G. M. Hopkins, G. W. Bromley, and George H. Waker.

Tips for Researchers: What’s in a (Street) Name?

I love a reference challenge, but it’s also gratifying to get a question and be able to give the asker the answer almost immediately. Though when we archivists do this it may seem like magic, most of the time it’s just knowing where to look and to what resources to point people. My time in the Cambridge Room is helping me immensely when it comes to performing this parlor trick with Cambridge-related queries.

For example, do you ever walk down a street in Cambridge and wonder for what or for whom it was named? The Cambridge Historical Commission has you covered with their comprehensive list of the origins of Cambridge Street Names. If your wonderings/wanderings take you further and you want to know about a particular address, the myCambridge database about which Alyssa told you in an earlier post and the database of Cambridge Buildings and Architects maintained through Harvard are great resources for delving a bit more deeply into the history of Cambridge addresses from the comfort of your computer or mobile device. And if you’re of an analytical bent, there’s a fun set of maps over on Bostonography based on the latter that provide a visualization of the types of Cambridge street names and where they are in the city.

 streetsnearCPLStreets near the future site of the Main Library of the Cambridge Public Library, from the Atlas of the City of Cambridge, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, by G.M. Hopkins, 1873

So you’ve found the namesake for your street – where next? If you’re really lucky, your street is named after someone well-known enough to have his or her own Wikipedia page, or has a sufficiently unusual name to be easily Google-able. Though you’ll have to vet the results for yourself, the resources you uncover are a great place to start and can lead you down many fascinating paths. You may also want to check WorldCat, to see what relevant material has been cataloged at libraries around the world, and ArchiveGrid, for material in archival repositories. If your person is a pre-20th century Cambridge celebrity, the Proceedings of the Cambridge Historical Society, which the Society has put online, can be really helpful; check the index for references in papers published between 1905 and 1979.

And if you’re stumped, how about contacting your friendly local archivist and giving her or him a shot at it? Like I said, we love a challenge.

For Map Enthusiasts


Image courtesy of the GIS Department, City of Cambridge

The City of Cambridge’s Department of Graphic Information Systems or GIS has a wonderful online tool that allows users to view a variety of interactive Cambridge maps.  You can view maps with detailed information on the City’s parks, sewers, zoning, traffic, construction, and water.  Those with an eye towards history can use the Historical Viewer, which maps historic areas of Cambridge and offers maps from three time periods:  2003, 1947, and 1865.  You can type in an individual address or view Cambridge as a whole.  To explore the GIS online tools, click here:  http://www.cambridgema.gov/GIS/search.cfm?applicationid=historicalpub