Tag Archives: Tips for Researchers

Recording Available – Healing the Historical Trauma of Slavery Through Genealogical Research

We were fortunate to have Sharon Leslie Morgan, renowned genealogist and founder of Our Black Ancestry, help commemorate Juneteenth at the Cambridge Public Library. Morgan’s workshop, Healing the Historical Trauma of Slavery Through Genealogical Research, was recorded on June 17, 2021. The workshop was part of the Cambridge Room’s Lunchtime Virtual Lecture Series.

The following is a description of the workshop and a short bio of Sharon Leslie Morgan:

Juneteenth Commemoration: Healing the Historical Trauma of Slavery Through Genealogical Research
Has your genealogical research forced you to confront the racial wounds of the past – from slavery to the many forms of racism it engendered?  Facing “historical trauma” is as necessary for African Americans researching their ancestors who were enslaved as it is for White people who discover their ancestors were enslavers. 

To commemorate Juneteenth, join us for a workshop with Sharon Leslie Morgan, renowned genealogist and founder of Our Black Ancestry, as we learn about historical trauma and how it affects people today.  Morgan will introduce the STAR (Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience) model for healing historical trauma and show how genealogical research can help heal the trauma of slavery.   

Sharon Leslie Morgan is a writer and genealogist. She is the founder of Our Black Ancestry, an online community dedicated to providing resources for African American genealogical research, preserving historic materials and properties, and promoting healing of wounds that are the legacy of slavery.

Morgan is the co-author of Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade. She is also a contributor to Slavery’s Descendants: Shared Legacies of Race & Reconciliation, and The Little Book of Racial Healing: Coming to the Table for Truth-Telling, Liberation, and Transformation.  In 2019, Morgan received the prestigious James Dent Walker Award from the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society

A staunch advocate of racial justice, Morgan has taken STAR (Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience) training at Eastern Mennonite University and is actively involved with Coming to the Table, an organization that promotes linkages between descendants of people who were enslaved and descendants of the families that enslaved them for the purpose of healing from the trauma of slavery.

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Recording Available – American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections

We were fortunate to have Drew Griffin, the Library’s Senior Librarian for Adult Services and bibliophile, join us for a lively and informative workshop titled American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections. The workshop, part of the Lunchtime Lectures from the Cambridge Room, was recorded on May 13, 2021.

The following is a description of the workshop and a short bio of Drew Griffin:

American Treasures from the Cambridge Public Library’s Archives and Special Collections
Join Drew Griffin, Cambridge Public Library’s Senior Librarian for Adult Services, as he takes us on a tour of the American Treasures in the Library’s Archives and Special Collections.  This lecture will focus on letters from George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Paul Revere, Margaret Fuller, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and more.  Discover all our Library has to offer with special, virtual trip into the vault.

Drew Griffin has worked at the Cambridge Public Library for the past 15 years in various capacities.  Since 2016, he has served as Senior Librarian in the Adult Services Department.  Drew’s area of expertise is genealogy and rare book librarianship.   Over the past 3 years, Drew has taught many of the Library’s popular genealogy workshops, including beginner’s genealogy and DNA testing and genealogical research.  Also, in his spare time, Drew is an avid rare book collector.  He is a member several bibliophile clubs, including the Grolier Club in New York City and the Ticknor Society in Boston.  

Recording Available – Linked Descendants: African American Genealogy Prior to 1870

We were fortunate to have Sharon Leslie Morgan, founder of Our Black Ancestry, join us for a lively and informative workshop titled Linked Descendants: African American Genealogy Prior to 1870. The workshop, part of the Lunchtime Lectures from the Cambridge Room, was recorded on April 8, 2021.

The following is a description of the workshop and a short bio of Sharon Leslie Morgan:

Linked Descendants:  African American Genealogy Prior to 1870
Join us for a workshop with Sharon Leslie Morgan, renowned genealogist and founder of Our Black Ancestry, as we delve into African American ancestry before abolition.  Researching African American families prior to the 1870 Census is a challenge that may be overcome by finding linked descendants – or the white families who enslaved most of the Black population.  Learn new research techniques and use genealogy as a tool for confronting slavery and heal. 

Sharon Leslie Morgan is a writer and genealogist. She is the founder of Our Black Ancestry, an online community dedicated to providing resources for African American genealogical research, preserving historic materials and properties, and promoting healing of wounds that are the legacy of slavery.

Morgan is the co-author of Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade. She is also a contributor to Slavery’s Descendants: Shared Legacies of Race & Reconciliation, and The Little Book of Racial Healing: Coming to the Table for Truth-Telling, Liberation, and Transformation.  In 2019, Morgan received the prestigious James Dent Walker Award from the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society

A staunch advocate of racial justice, Morgan has taken STAR (Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience) training at Eastern Mennonite University and is actively involved with Coming to the Table, an organization that promotes linkages between descendants of people who were enslaved and descendants of the families that enslaved them for the purpose of healing from the trauma of slavery.

Veteran’s History Project at the Library of Congress

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We’ve just stumbled upon another great resource for researchers.  The Veterans History Project  of the American Folklife Center collects, preserves, and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of  war.

The Project collects first-hand accounts of  U.S. Veterans from  the following wars:

  • World War I (1914-1920)
  • World War II (1939-1946)
  • Korean War (1950-1955)
  • Vietnam War (1961-1975)
  • Persian Gulf War (1990-1995)
  • Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts (2001-present)

In addition, those U.S. citizen civilians who were actively involved in supporting war efforts (such as war industry workers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, etc.) are also invited to share their valuable stories.

The first hand accounts are fully searchable in a database, freely accessible here.