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Discovering Our History, Telling Our Stories

Digital stories created by students in a collaboration with CCTV and Cambridge Public Library genealogy workshops

In late 2017, the Cambridge Public library began a collaboration with CCTV to work with students in the library’s genealogy workshops. The purpose of the program, funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Cambridge Arts Council, was to teach those who had been studying their families’ histories the technical skills to produce digital stories about their families.

Here’s one of those stories.

Discovering Our History, Telling Our Stories

Digital stories created by students in a collaboration with CCTV and Cambridge Public Library genealogy workshops

In late 2017, the Cambridge Public library began a collaboration with CCTV to work with students in the library’s genealogy workshops. The purpose of the program, funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Cambridge Arts Council, was to teach those who had been studying their families’ histories the technical skills to produce digital stories about their families.

Here’s one of those stories.

Discovering Our History, Telling Our Stories

Digital stories created by students in a collaboration with CCTV and Cambridge Public Library genealogy workshops

In late 2017, the Cambridge Public library began a collaboration with CCTV to work with students in the library’s genealogy workshops. The purpose of the program, funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Cambridge Arts Council, was to teach those who had been studying their families’ histories the technical skills to produce digital stories about their families.

Here’s one of those stories.

Discovering Our History, Telling Our Stories

Digital stories created by students in a collaboration with CCTV and Cambridge Public Library genealogy workshops

In late 2017, the Cambridge Public library began a collaboration with CCTV to work with students in the library’s genealogy workshops. The purpose of the program, funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Cambridge Arts Council, was to teach those who had been studying their families’ histories the technical skills to produce digital stories about their families.

Here’s one of those stories.

 

Discovering Our History, Telling Our Stories
Join us to view the work of the graduates of CCTV’s Digital Storytelling Class. This screening will feature several short films produced by our students, based on family history research conducted through the library’s Beginner’s Genealogy Workshop Series. Hear from the students about the process of creating these films and the impact that it has had on them and their families.

Date & Time:
6:30pm – 8:00pm, Thursday, November 15, 2018
Location:
Main Library, Lecture Hall

REGISTER HERE

Researching the History of Your Cambridge House:  Branch Tour!
Are you interested in learning more about where you live or the property you own? This hour-long workshop will guide you through a variety of online resources that will help you research your home from the comfort of your home. Discover when your building was built and by whom. Find out who lived in your house and how your neighborhood has changed.  Registration is mandatory.

Date, Time & Location:
6:00pm – 7:00pm, Wednesday, November 28, O’Connell Branch, REGISTER HERE
6:00pm – 7:00pm, Wednesday, December 5, O’Neill Branch, REGISTER HERE
6:00pm – 7:00pm, Wednesday, December 11, Central Branch, REGISTER HERE
3:00pm – 4:00pm, Thursday, January 10, Collins Branch, REGISTER HERE
3:00pm – 4:00pm, Tuesday, January 15, Boudreau Branch, REGISTER HERE


Muralist Elizabeth Tracy painting the “Development of the Printing Press,” courtesy of the Cambridge Historical Commission, Cambridge Photo Morgue Collection.

To follow up on our post about muralist Elizabeth Tracy, our friends at the fantastic Cambridge Historical Commission sent us a photograph of Tracy in action with fellow muralist, Arthur Willis Oakman.  Tracy and Oakman are painting “the Development of the Printing Press,” on the west wall of the Library’s Reading Room.  This mural follows the evolution of the printing press from Guttenberg in 1449 through the invention of the cylindrical press by Hoe and Co. in 1820. At the center is the 1639 Stephen Daye press of Cambridge, the first press in America.

The photograph, along with a large collection of the Cambridge Historical Commission’s photographs, can be found on the Digital Commonwealth website.