Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Researching the History of Your Cambridge House
Are you interested in learning more about where you live or the property you own? This hour-long, hands-on workshop will guide you through a variety of online resources that will help you research your home from the comfort of your home. Discover when your building was built and by whom. Find out who lived in your house and how your neighborhood has changed. We will provide laptops. Registration is mandatory.  We are offering two classes – but you only need to register for one!

Date & Time:
6:00pm – 7:00pm, Wednesday, February 7, 2018
Location:
Main Library, Community Room

REGISTER HERE

Date & Time:
3:00pm – 4:00pm, Thursday, February 8, 2018
Location:
Main Library, Beech Room

REGISTER HERE

Advertisements


Boston GLF’s 10-Point Demands Presented to the Democratic National Convention in Miami Beach, July 1972.  Found in “Biographies, Shively, Charles,” Cambridge Subject Files, 1817-Present.

Boston’s Gay Liberation Front (GLF) asked the above 10 demands be incorporated into the 1972 Democratic Party Platform.  The party didn’t respond to what must have been a radical request.  In fact the platform didn’t include anything on gay rights.  The only point that Boston GLF and the Democratic Party Platform agreed on was ending the war in Vietnam.  You can read the official platform, adopted on July 10, 1972, here.

 


Charles Shively and Cat, photograph taken from Shively’s memorial service in December 2017.

Charles Shively:  Cambridge Poet and Activist, 1937-2017

Exhibition Location: 2nd Floor of the Main Library

This exhibition, curated by Daniel Wuenschel, features a selection of photographs of and poems and books by Charles Shively, Cambridge poet, author, and activist.   Shively was active in the Boston LBGTQ+ movement in the 1970s, helping to form Gay Men’s Liberation.  In 1971,  he helped found the Fag Rag Collective, which published the Fag Rag, the first national post-Stonewall gay political journal.   Shively published a series of twelve essays, in Fag Rag beginning with “Cocksucking as an Act of Revolution,” a piece that became seminal to gay male political theory in the post-Stonewall era.

Also, Shively founded Fag Rag Books, the Good Gay Poets Collective and Press, and Boston Gay Review, a journal of cultural criticism.  Shively gained fame during the 1977 Boston Gay Pride March by nearly causing a riot for burning pages from the bible, his insurance policy, his Harvard diploma, and a teaching contract.  In the late 1980s, Shively published his research on Walt Whitman in two volumes:  Calamus Lovers: Walt Whitman’s Working Class Camerados (1987) and Drum Beats: Walt Whitman’s Civil War Boy Lovers.  He was a tenured professor at U-Mass Boston in the American Studies Program.  He died on October 6, 2017, just shy of his 80th birthday.

Shively’s 1975 book of poems, Nuestra Señora de los Dolores: The San Francisco Experience, which is featured in the exhibition, is from the Louisa Solano Papers, 1956-2013.

 

Read Shively’s obituary in the Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide by Michael Bronski, Professor of Practice in Media and Activism in Studies of Women, Gender, and at Harvard University.

Are you looking for something fun to do in the new year?  Join the Cambridge Public Library for our popular 4-week beginner’s genealogy workshop series.   Classes will be held at CCTV, located at 438 Massachusetts Avenue.

Wednesdays, 6-8 PM
January 10, 17, 24, & 31
Instructors:  Alyssa Pacy, Archivist, and Drew Griffin, Senior Librarian
Location:  CCTV computer classroom, 438 Massachusetts Avenue

Join us for a 4-week, beginner’s genealogy workshop. For two hours each week, we will demystify the overwhelming process of sorting through online records as well as give tips for how best to make use of research visits to local repositories. We will help you find ancestors, organize your research, and start a family tree. Come with a new question every week and leave with an answer and something tangible to bring home, such as a copy of a birth certificate. By taking this class, you will be automatically eligible to enroll in a FREE, two-part course on digital storytelling taught by CCTV. Learn how to make a digital film about your family’s history based on your genealogical research. Create a treasured digital keepsake to pass on to family members. Registration is mandatory for the series.  To register, please contact Keaton Fox at keaton@cctvcambridge.org.

Do something new in 2018 and take a free class at the Cambridge Public Library.  Learn about your ancestry or the history of your Cambridge house.  Preserve your family photographs or learn how to become an expert in the U.S. Census.  We are offering a series of free classes and workshops between January and March, 2018.

Beginner’s Genealogy Workshop Series
January 10, 17, 24, 31, 6-8 PM

Introduction to Digital Storytelling
January 22 & 29, 6-8 PM

Researching the History of Your Cambridge Home
February 7, 6-8 PM or February 8, 3-4 PM

Preserving and Organizing Your Family Photographs Workshop Series
February 21 & 28, 6-8 PM

The United States Census and Genealogy
March 7, 6-8 PM

Beginner’s Genealogy Workshop Series
March 14, 21, 28, April 4, 2-4 PM

Register now for one of our six new classes being offered in early 2018.  Spaces are filling up fast!

The Cambridge Public Library is taking our Beginner’s Genealogy Workshop Series on the road.  This January we will be offering the 4-week series at CCTV, located at 438 Massachusetts Avenue.  It’s the same class – just a different location.

Wednesdays, 6-8 PM
January 10, 17, 24, & 31
Instructors:  Alyssa Pacy, Archivist, and Drew Griffin, Senior Librarian
Location:  CCTV computer classroom, 438 Massachusetts Avenue

Join us for a 4-week, beginner’s genealogy workshop. For two hours each week, we will demystify the overwhelming process of sorting through online records as well as give tips for how best to make use of research visits to local repositories. We will help you find ancestors, organize your research, and start a family tree. Come with a new question every week and leave with an answer and something tangible to bring home, such as a copy of a birth certificate. By taking this class, you will be automatically eligible to enroll in a FREE, two-part course on digital storytelling taught by CCTV. Learn how to make a digital film about your family’s history based on your genealogical research. Create a treasured digital keepsake to pass on to family members. Registration is mandatory for the series.  To register, please contact Keaton Fox at keaton@cctvcambridge.org.

How We Elect Cambridge Officials: A Discussion on Proportional Representation
Monday, November 6, 6:30 PM
Lecture Hall, Cambridge Main Library

Cambridge municipal elections happen on Tuesday, November 7th. Do you find it curious that we rank our candidates numerically when we vote? Did you know that this process of voting is called Proportional Representation? Do you know how Proportional Representation works? Do you know how it came to be that Cambridge adopted this system?

Join us for a lively panel discussion with experts on Cambridge political history. Discover how Proportional Representation works in our city. Learn just how much your vote counts to be better prepared for the November 7th election.

Panelists include Howie Fain (Co-founder of Fair Vote), Glenn Koocher (former Cambridge School Committee Member), Susana Segat (former Cambridge School Committee Member), and Robert Winters (founder of Cambridge Civic Journal).

Howie Fain
In 1992, Fain Co-founded Fair Vote, a nonpartisan champion of electoral reforms that give voters greater choice. He served as the President of the Fair Ballot Alliance of Massachusetts from 1991-1997. Fain has been a consultant to the Cambridge Election Commission, authoring the 1994 report, Computerizing a Cambridge Tradition. Fain serves as an Executive Committee Member of VoterChoice Massachusetts and is a science teacher in the Worcester Public Schools.

Glenn Koocher
A native of Cambridge, Mass., Koocher served on the Cambridge School Committee from 1974-1985. He was the budget chair during the implementation of Proposition 2 1/2 and was actively engaged in the city’s multi-year desegregation effort. Koocher was the founding host of Cambridge InsideOut, a weekly TV show on CCTV focusing on current events that aired from 1989-2000. He has written extensively on the political history of Cambridge. Koocher is currently the executive director of the Massachusetts Association of School Committees.

Susana Segat
Segat was a member of the Cambridge School Committee from 1996-2001. She was the first Hispanic elected official in Cambridge to serve a full term and win re-election.  Segat was the founding chair of the Massachusetts Commission on the Status of Women, on which she served from 1999-2008.  A longtime union official, Segat was the President of the Local Service Employees International Union (SEIU) from 2003-2009.  In 2013, she cofounded CCTV’s Cambridge InsideOut, a remake of Glenn Koocher’s original TV show, focusing on Cambridge politics.  Segat cohosts the biannual Cambridge municipal election night on CCTV.  She is currently the Chief of Staff at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

Robert Winters
Winters is the founding editor of the Cambridge Civic Journal, an online news source that monitors the Cambridge political scene. Starting in 1989, he spearheaded the campaign to bring curbside recycling to Cambridge. He ran for City Council several times in the 1990’s. Since 2013 he has been the co-host of CCTV’s Cambridge InsideOut, a remake of Glenn Koocher’s original TV show, focusing on Cambridge politics. Currently, Winters is a Lecturer in Mathematics at MIT and the Harvard Extension School.